Archaeological Fieldwork: Summer 2020

It was an unusual summer for archaeological fieldwork in Italy, with many teams sadly unable to excavate due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. However, following the necessary precautions, the archaeologists at the BSR were able to continue its rich programme of archaeological surveys in support of its own research programme and those of other colleagues.

Fieldwork in Rome has continued on our ERC funded research project Rome Transformed (led by Newcastle University, with the Università degli Studi di Firenze and the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche). In June, Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey was conducted inside the Amphitheatrum Castrense, a 3rd century AD amphitheatre that formed part of the Sessorium.

GPR survey in the Amphitheatrum Castrense, inside the property of the Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme (Photo: Francesca Carboni)

With the support of experts from Geostudi Astier and the kind permission of Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma, another geophysical technique, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), was also used to survey parts of the Circus Varianus which also formed part of the complex.

ERT inside the Circus Varianus, with the Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in the background (Photo: Stephen Kay)
BSR Geophysical Researcher Elena Pomar conducting topographical survey at the Circus Varianus (Photo: Stephen Kay)

Together with the team from Geostudi Astier, ERT was also conducted inside the public gardens in Viale Carlo Felice, with the aim of mapping deeply buried structures alongside the Aurelian walls. The work was conducted with the generous support of the project partners the Sovrintendenza Capitolina.

BSR and Geostudi Astier teams working with ERT in Viale Carlo Felice, next to the Aurelian walls (Photo: Francesca Carboni)

In July, the BSR archaeology team headed into the Sabina to Cotilia, northeast of Rome, to conduct GPR and magnetometry surveys at the so-called ‘Baths of Vespasian’ on the behalf of colleagues at Saint Mary’s University, Halifax.

BSR Archaeology Officer Stephen Kay conducting magnetometry survey at Cotilia (Photo: Elena Pomar)

The site, which lies alongside the ancient consular road of the Via Salaria, is a sprawling complex whose precise function is still unclear but which includes thermal baths and a medieval church.

An excavated section of the Via Salaria at Cotilia (Photo: Stephen Kay)

From the hills of the Sabina, the team then headed across Lazio to the Tyrrhenian coast and the wonderful site of Vulci, an Etruscan and then later Roman city. In 2019 the BSR had conducted a preliminary survey at the site, testing GPR and magnetometry, on the behalf of the University of Gothenburg. The exciting results, shortly to be published in the Bollettino di Archeologia Online, encouraged the team to further extend the GPR survey to map larger parts of the city.

BSR Geophysical Researcher Elena Pomar conducting GPR survey at Vulci (Photo: Stephen Kay)
A paved section of the roads inside the city of Vulci (Photo: Stephen Kay)