Epiphany in Rome: Leo the Great and Pope Francis

To start the new year we have a very timely blog post by current Ralegh Radford Rome Fellow Matthew Hoskin who looks back to the Epiphany sermons of one of his ‘favourite Church Fathers’ Pope Leo the Great.

Matthew contemplates how in 2016 Pope Francis’ celebration of Epiphany at St Peter’s connects him to a tradition that goes back over 1500 years.

‘Part of what sets Rome’s liturgy apart from that of the rest of the Latin West is the Stational Liturgy. The Stational Liturgy is an aspect of Roman worship that developed over the course of the Middle Ages; it sets out where the Pope will celebrate Mass on the major feasts and the Sundays of Advent and Lent, each feast and ‘station’ having its own traditions associated with it. Yesterday, the Feast of Epiphany, Pope Francis continued the ancient tradition of the Stational Liturgy by celebrating Mass in the morning at San Pietro in Vaticano beneath Michelangelo’s grand dome following a procession to San Pietro of pilgrims dressed like their mediaeval ancestors and bearing symbolic gifts.

Liturgy is a living link between us today and earlier generations of Christians. Therefore, I would like to connect yesterday’s Stational Liturgy with the ancient sources using Pope Leo the Great (pope, 440-461) who was not only the subject of my PhD dissertation but is one of my favourite Church Fathers all around.

Leo the Great is the first pope for whom a substantive body of sermons survives. These sermons are important sources for our knowledge of the Stational Liturgy in Leo’s time; in fact, as Michele Salzman argued in her 2013 JRS article, ‘Leo the Great’s Liturgical Topography’, much of the Stational Liturgy as visible in Leo’s sermons was itself a construction of this fifth-century pope.

97 of Leo’s sermons survive, all but two of them essentially festal or liturgical sermons. Many of these sermons are transmitted to us with details of where they were preached or have allusions and external evidence to suggest where the feast was celebrated — hence our ability to put together the Stational Liturgy of mid-fifth-century Rome.

For the most part, Leo preached at San Pietro in Vaticano. This basilica was already a focus of much Roman episcopal activity, and Leo’s expansion of its use had a lasting effect on the Stational Liturgy; as Salzman notes, by the year 800, San Pietro had 13 stational services each year.

Leo’s sermons are not explicit as to where the Epiphany sermons, of which we have eight, were preached, but Salzman believes them likely to have been preached at San Pietro in Vaticano, based upon Gregory the Great’s (pope, 590-604) use of San Pietro on Epiphany (p. 219). Given the traditionalism of Roman liturgy and Leo’s frequent celebrations in San Pietro, this suggestion is entirely likely.

Thus, simply by celebrating the Eucharist in San Pietro, Pope Francis is connecting himself to an ancient tradition that goes back over 1500 years to the 440s. Of course, the ancient basilica was very different from its Renaissance successor today — in Leo’s day, it would have had many of the images associated with other ancient Roman basilicas. The aisles of the nave would have depicted scenes from the Old and New Testaments, as in Santa Maria Maggiore. The apse would have had a mosaic of Christ, as in so many old basilicas. The facade acquired mosaics in the fifth century as well, depicting the 24 Elders of Revelation with wreaths, the four Creatures, and the Lamb — once again, a now-traditional mosaic in Roman basilicas. Much gold would have covered the interior of the basilica as well. According to the Liber Pontificalis 47.6, after the Vandal sack in 455, Leo ‘renewed St Peter’s basilica and the apse-vault’ (trans. R. Davis in The Book of Pontiffs).

Here’s a mosaic from Old St Peter’s that I saw in San Marco, Venice:

matthew1

Image taken by Matthew Hoskin

Thus, the setting, the same but different. I am unaware what the current Pope preached, exactly, but it was almost inevitably thematic — the visitation of the magi to the Christ child. In his first Epiphany sermon, from 441, Leo proclaims that this is a feast for the entire human race:

After celebrating very recently that day on which inviolate virginity gave birth to the Saviour of the human race, the venerable feast of Epiphany gives to us, dearly beloved, ongoing joy, so that the vigour of rejoicing and the fervour of faith may not grow cool amongst the neighbouring sacraments of related solemnities. For it is with respect to the salvation of all humans that the infancy of the Mediator between God and men (cf. 1 Tim. 2:5) was declared to the whole world at that time when He was detained in that small, little town. For although He had selected the Israelite nation and one family of this people from whom He might take on the nature of all humanity, nevertheless, He did not wish to lie concealed amongst the narrow relationships of His mother’s dwelling-place, but wished to be known by all soon — He Who was worthy to be born for all. Therefore, to three magi in the region of the East appeared a star of strange clarity, which was more shining and more beautiful than the rest of the stars, and easily turned the eyes and spirits of the observers to itself, so that immediately there was a turning that was not restful since it seemed so unusual. Therefore, He gave understanding to those watching, He Who furnished the sign, and that which could be understood, He made to be inquired after, and the One sought offered Himself to be found. (Sermon 31.1; my hasty trans.)

Leo offers the traditional reading of the magi’s gifts, ‘The incense they offer to God, the myrrh to Man, the gold to the King, consciously paying honour to the Divine and human Nature in union:  because while each substance had its own properties, there was no difference in the power of either.’ (NPNF trans. on CCEL) But he never simply tells a Bible story or explicates a piece of theology; here, I believe, the ancient pope and today’s pope are similar, for Leo moves on to exhort his congregation to their own good deeds. Scripture, theology, worship, and the life of piety are all bound together in the minds of the ancient theologians and preachers. Leo thus closes Sermon 31:

Follow after humility which the Son of God deigned to teach His disciples.  Put on the power of patience, in which ye may be able to gain your souls; seeing that He who is the Redemption of all, is also the Strength of all.  “Set your minds on the things which are above, not on the things which are on the earth.” (Col. 3:2)  Walk firmly along the path of truth and life:  let not earthly things hinder you for whom are prepared heavenly things through our Lord Jesus Christ, who with the Father and the Holy Ghost liveth and reigneth for ever and ever.  Amen. (NPNF trans. on CCEL)

Thus does Leo the Great, through the Stational Liturgy and his preaching on Epiphany, connect the world of ancient Roman Christianity with our world today. Let us not neglect his memory or his teachings as we enter the season of Epiphanytide!’

Matthew Hoskin (Ralegh Radford Rome Fellow 2015-16)

Matthew publishes regularly on his own blog found at: https://thepocketscroll.wordpress.com/

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