New discoveries at Segni

Last Saturday we hosted a second open day for the general public of the extraordinary Roman nymphaeum in Segni which the BSR, together with the Museo Comunale di Segni (http://www.museosegni.it/), is excavating. The participation and support for this work is fantastic, with over 300 people attending the conference and visit to the monument.

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Visitors at the open day, May 2014

The project began in 2013 and will be completed by early 2015. The work, which forms part of the Segni Project (http://www.bsr.ac.uk/research/archaeology/ongoing-projects/segni-project), began with the local council buying the monument to bring it into the public domain.

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The Roman nymphaeum

Last summer the BSR and ACRG of the University of Southampton (James Miles) completed the first phase of work, undertaking a laser scan (http://vimeo.com/79791979) of the structure in order to accurately record its preservation. This was followed by a first season of excavation which cleared the area immediately in front of the monument, which is buried to a depth of about 3 metres.

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The next phase will see the careful removal of the modern building which surrounds the nymphaem and the construction of a lighter, detached pavilion in order to protect the monument. At this time the excavation in front will be completed and the conservation work undertaken on the monument itself. Alongside all this activity, the museum, BSR and APSS have continued the research about the monument by undertaking a GPR survey of the immediate area around the structure.

Stephen Kay (BSR Molly Cotton Fellow) undertaking a GPR survey

Whilst complicated by the steep terrain (the nymphaeum lies on the hillside of Segni), the initial results (https://twitter.com/SegniProject/status/465173240617635840/photo/1) seem to indicate a continuation of the monument directly in front. The results of the survey will shortly be published by the project. You can see more images on the Flickr pages (https://www.flickr.com/photos/segniproject/sets/72157644627313041/) of the project and keep up to date with the research via Twitter at @SegniProject.

By Stephen Kay (BSR Molly Cotton Fellow)

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